Munich Agreement Chamberlain

December 13, 2020 in Uncategorized by

In the face of tensions between the Germans and the Czechoslovakian government, on 15 September 1938, Benes secretly proposed to cede 6,000 square kilometres to Czechoslovakia in Germany, in exchange for a German accession agreement of 1.5 to 2.0 million South Germans that expelled Czechoslovakia. Hitler did not respond. [13] One aspect of the immense agitation of the last fourteen days must affect anyone who thinks about his or her history. In the three most powerful countries in Central and Eastern Europe, people had no right to know what was said and done outside. There seems to have been very little news in Russia. In Germany and Italy, the message was deliberately falsified while it was not repressed. The German people were not to know the embassy of President Roosevelt. The Italian people were led to believe that Chamberlain agreed with Hitler and was only putting pressure on Benes. One of his speeches gave them a false version. The economic consequences of the Munich agreement will certainly be very severe for Czechoslovakia.

The loss of industries, railwayheads, knots, etc., cannot help but cause a sharp loss of trade and unemployment. There is no doubt that Czechoslovakia becomes the object of quasi-colonial exploitation for Germany. [Silence] An agreement signed at the Munich Conference in September 1938 handed over the German-speaking country of Sudetenland to Czechoslovakia to Germany. The agreement was reached between Germany, Italy, Great Britain and France. Czechoslovakia was not allowed to attend the conference. In March 1939, six months after the signing of the Munich Agreement, Hitler violated the agreement and destroyed the Czech state. UCLA Film and Television Archives The slogan “Above us, without us!” (Czech: O n`s bez n`s!) sums up the feelings of the Czechoslovakian population (Slovakia and the Czech Republic) towards the agreement. [Citation required] On its way to Germany, Czechoslovakia (as the state was renamed) lost its reasonable border with Germany and its fortifications. Without it, its independence became more nominal than more real.

The agreement also caused Czechoslovakia to lose 70% of its steel industry, 70% of its electricity and 3.5 million citizens to Germany. [61] The Sudeten Germans celebrated what they saw as their liberation.